Finns want to know more about the environmental impacts of media

News |

However, a study of Finnish attitudes and opinions on communications reveals that they would like to receive more information on the environmental impacts of different media.

Finnish consumers are not ready to relinquish printed communications. Over 70% of the study participants considered printed communications an important source of  information, entertainment and relaxation. For example, three out of four citizens would prefer to read books in the printed format now and in the future. The industry’s strong desire to reduce its environmental load has been demonstrated with continuous investments, which have not gone unnoticed by consumers.

Information about environmental impacts wanted

The study revealed a great need for information about the environmental impacts of different media. Only 16% of consumers said that they knew very much or a good deal about the environmental impacts of different media. More than half of consumers indicated that they would like to know more about the subject.
 
Different media complement one another

The significance and environmental impacts of print communications have been called into question under pressure from electronic media, even though the reality is that different media support one another and complement the supply available to consumers. Environmental messages are often simplified, and consumers don’t always correctly perceive the actual environmental impacts of different media.

However, the study revealed that up to 27% of Finns were under the impression that use of the Internet had no environmental impact at all. They also reckoned that one hour of daily Internet use would have a substantially smaller effect on climate change than an annual subscription to a daily newspaper or a weekly magazine.
 
According to a Danish study that measures climate change, the carbon footprints of an annual newspaper subscription and one hour’s daily Internet use are in reality about the same, while the carbon footprint of an annual subscription to a weekly magazine is clearly smaller than the other two.    

Study examined Finnish attitudes and opinions on printed communications

The actors of the printed communications sector, newspaper and magazine publishers, the print and paper industries, importers and wholesalers as well as suppliers of delivery services, commissioned the questionnaire survey from TNS Gallup in order to gauge Finnish attitudes and opinions on printed communications. 

The aim was to find out what Finns think about printed communications and what kinds of qualities they associate it with. Finnish attitudes and opinions on electronic communications were also analysed in the same conjunction to facilitate comparisons. More than 1,000 active-aged Finns responded to the survey.

More information: Päivi Luoma, Director, Communications, Finnish Forest Industries, tel. +358 40 542 9926